WellJet FAQs

Rainbow

“WHY DO WELLS GO BAD?”

It’s simple, really:  wells go bad because they get clogged up.  Whether it’s calcium carbonate, iron bacteria, clay, silt, sand, drill mud or the yucky-sounding bio-slime, when enough foreign matter gets into the perforations of the well screen, performance suffers.  But blocked perfs are only the tip of the iceberg.  The real obstructions lie behind the well screen, in the gravel pack.

“WHAT ABOUT TRADITIONAL REHAB EFFORTS?”

Most methods for rehabilitating underperforming wells have been around since the last millennium:  brushing, scraping, heat, cold, explosives, bursts of compressed gas, etc. All of these methods can remove deposits from the well screen.  But what they can’t do safely, consistently or effectively is go beyond the well screen, into the gravel pack.

“HOW IS WELLJET DIFFERENT?”

WellJet, the unique process invented by HPC founder Jeff Glass, utilizes an array of custom-built, high-pressure rotating nozzles jetting streams of water into the well. Like traditional methods, WellJet thoroughly cleans the well screen.  But in addition, WellJet penetrates deep into the gravel pack, breaking up those deposits that are the true cause of deteriorating well performance.  Silt, sand, clay and drill mud are all dislodged, opening up the filter zone so that the aquifer can flow freely again.  No other method can accomplish this previously unattainable goal.  Although others have used some forms of “water-jetting,” they all operate at less than 10,000 psi – which may remove some deposits, but not all.  And no other jetting system has WellJet’s patented internal nozzle design, which enables us to generate so much energy into the gravel pack.

“WILL WELLJET HURT MY WELL?”

No.  Experience has shown us that obstructive deposits inside wells have a bonding strength of about 15,000 psi.  WellJet operates at up to 20,000 psi – more than enough to break those bonds and remove the obstructions.  But steel – even the mild steel used in well construction – has a yield strength of 35,000-55,000 psi.  WellJet can’t hurt your well; we can only improve its performance.  Having said that, it is true that eventually, a steel pipe in the ground will deteriorate.  Over time, casing integrity can be lost – in which case a well must be lined or abandoned.  But WellJet can extend the working life of that aging well, so that replacement strategy can be planned in an orderly fashion.

“IS WELLJET ALL I NEED TO RESTORE MY WELL’S PERFORMANCE?”

In some cases, yes.  With a fast-moving aquifer, all we have to do is use WellJet – and you’re back in business.  In other cases, additional steps are needed. Depending on conditions, WellJet will recommend other steps to complete the process of rehabilitation.  These may include surging, introduction of chemicals to destroy the potential for bacterial re-growth, and air-lifting the debris from the bottom of the well.

 “HOW WILL I KNOW WHAT OTHER STEPS ARE NEEDED?”

After we use WellJet, we recommend videotaping the results. If the water is clear and free-flowing, we’re done.  If not, we know more work must be done. But our analysis of the water, and our visual inspection of the well, will tell us exactly what additional steps are needed – and in which order those steps must be taken.

“WHAT KIND OF RESULTS CAN I EXPECT?”

Every well rehabilitation is different.  But WellJet has improved performance up to 1,000%.

“DOES WELLJET ALWAYS WORK?”

Over the past several years, WellJet has built up an impressive track record of success.  But there are no guarantees. In some cases, well owners have elected not to follow all of our recommendations.  In those few isolated incidents, although WellJet has opened everything up, not all of the debris has been removed.  The net effect is some improvement, but not the dramatic growth that could have been obtained with proper follow-through.

 “WHAT’S THE BOTTOM LINE?”

WellJet represents a quantum advance in the field of well rehabilitation.  We do what no one else can.  But in certain cases, WellJet is just one – albeit the most important – element in a comprehensive program that should be followed to obtain the best results.